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Phase IV: Implementing, Evaluating and Sustaining

Description

Description of Phase Four: Implementing, Evaluating, and Sustaining
Phase Four of the Programmatic Improvement Process involves implementing, evaluating, and sustaining the changes initiated through the Programmatic Improvement Action Plan.

Activity One: Implement Programmatic Improvement Action Plan
Based on the data and information gathered and interpreted in phases one through three of the Programmatic Improvement Process, phase four begins the implementation of the course(s) of action detailed in the Programmatic Improvement Action Plan. Implementation science research has identified the following core implementation components, or implementation drivers: staff selection, pre-service training, ongoing coaching and consultation, staff performance evaluation, data systems that support decision making, facilitative administrative support, and systems interventions. These drivers should be addressed in the Programmatic Improvement Action Plan. Success of the action plan relies on ensuring all of these areas are examined to address the identified causal factors contributing to the local educational agency’s (LEA’s) disproportionality. Also essential are goals, benchmarks, and timelines clearly stated in the plan that allow the leadership team and stakeholders to ensure accountability to the plan. For more information on implementation research, please visit the National Implementation Research Network Web site at http://nirn.fpg.unc.edu/.

Activity Two: Evaluate Effectiveness
The LEA will need to have a system to monitor and document the implementation of the Programmatic Improvement Action Plan. An ongoing process of reflection and assessment entails reviewing short-term and long-term measures using initial data points, and comparing these with benchmarks and intended outcomes.

The success of the action plan requires ongoing monitoring and evaluation of effectiveness. Periodically assessing progress will ensure the plan is on track to meet its goals. The Programmatic Improvement Action Plan should have built in an identified form of measurement(s) to gage effectiveness and to measure progress, as well as timelines for achieving expected outcomes.  As needed and based on progress monitoring, the team should be given the flexibility to make appropriate adjustments to the plan.

It is important to focus on implementing interventions with fidelity before jumping to adaptation. However, LEAs may continuously adjust or adapt the plans, actions, and resources they are using to support implementation. Data related to fidelity of implementation as well as progress measures should guide these changes. For more information on implementation research, please visit the National Implementation Research Network Web site at http://nirn.fpg.unc.edu/.

Activity Three: Build Supports and Plan for Sustainability
It is important to focus on implementing interventions with fidelity and putting supports in place before jumping to a sustainability plan. LEAs may continuously adjust or adapt their plans, actions, supports, and resources as they plan for change in disproportionate representation. Data related to fidelity of implementation as well as progress measures should guide these changes.

In education, “readiness for change” is something that needs to be developed, nurtured, and sustained. Readiness is not a pre‐existing condition waiting to be found or an enduring characteristic of a person, organization, or system. The same person, organization, or system can be in the Full Implementation stage with respect to one innovation and in the Exploration Stage for a different innovation. Accountability for creating readiness rests with the implementation team, not with those who are expected or invited to change.[1]

Building supports into the action plan as you evaluate where you are moves your plan to sustainability. Here are a few ideas to help move toward implementing change.

Comprehensive implementation strategies need to be in place to effectively and efficiently help teachers and others make use of education innovations to benefit students. This typically means investing in

  • Building local capacity for on‐going training
  • Developing and supporting a cadre of coaches who can facilitate full and effective use of innovations in practice
  • Organizing a formal plan of evaluation that emphasizes teacher/staff fidelity as well as student outcomes
  • Regular and repeated professional development experiences for faculty and staff who are engaged in the day‐to‐day implementation efforts[2]

The State Implementation and Scaling-up of Evidence-based Practices (SISEP) Center, funded by the U.S. Department of Education’s Office of Special Education Programs, provides a variety of scaling up briefs on their website at http://sisep.fpg.unc.edu/tools-and-resources/home.

Activity Four: Complete and Submit a Survey
At the conclusion of the 27-month Significant Disproportionality period, LEAs will receive an electronic survey via email from the State Performance Plan Technical Assistance Project (SPP-TAP). LEAs should complete and submit the brief survey as directed by SPP-TAP.  Information gathered through this process will inform future supports and services to LEAs addressing disproportionality.


[1] Scaling-up Brief, Dean Fixsen, Karen Blase, Rob Horner, Barbara Sims, & George Sugai, 2013, State Implementation & Scaling‐up of Evidence‐based Practices Center, University of North Carolina, Frank Porter Graham Child Development Center, page 1.

[2] Scaling-up Brief, Dean Fixsen, Karen Blase, Rob Horner, Barbara Sims, & George Sugai, 2013, State Implementation & Scaling‐up of Evidence‐based Practices Center, University of North Carolina, Frank Porter Graham Child Development Center, page 4.

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